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The Port of Hull

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The Port of Hull

Dry facts meet aesthetic beauty in this industrial film showcasing Hull’s status as a thriving international port.

Documentary 1963 29 mins

Overview

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Dry facts meet aesthetic beauty in this industrial film showcasing Hull’s status as a thriving international port. Produced by British Transport Films, best known for their whimsical travelogues promoting the joys of train travel, its pedigree is shown off in gorgeous colour photography by Patrick Carey, which finds beauty in the ebb and flow of maritime monsters on the River Humber. Goods range from Scandinavian timber at Victoria Dock to chemicals and petroleum syphoned off at Salt End and new cars nonchalantly piloted into mammoth holds at King George Dock. Hovering above it all, giant Martian-like cranes.

Hull is perhaps more commonly known as a centre of Britain’s fishing industry, but this was already in decline by 1963 and the film situates the port as Hull’s industrial jewel. Despite challenging economic times, the Port of Hull has continued to grow into the 21st century, with developments including the expansion of cargo and passenger ferry services on North Sea routes.