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Frankenstein

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Frankenstein 1931 PG

70 mins USA Director. James Whale

Boris Karloff’s iconic performance as the shambling yet sensitive monster, cobbled together from dead bodies by deranged scientist Henry Frankenstein, is one of cinema’s most influential performances, in the gothic horror film that inspired the first big wave of cinematic horror.

But the first feature-length adaptation of Mary Shelley’s isn’t just historically significant, it remains an intelligent and affecting film about the limits of science, blind prejudice and what it means to be human.

Mary Shelley’s original novel set the template for both Gothic fiction and science fiction (professors playing god), emphasising the story’s significance to the development of two genres that BFI has recently celebrated with major seasons.

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Directed by

James Whale

Featuring

Boris Karloff

Colin Clive

Mae Clarke

Genres

Science Fiction Horror

Collection

Monstrous Gothic: The Dark Heart of Film Halloween The Dark Arts Based on the Book… Closed Captions

Certificate

PG

Released

1931

Country

USA

Language

English

Production company

Universal Pictures Corporation

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