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Bringing It Home
Bringing It Home

Bringing It Home 1940

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Bringing It Home 1940

20 mins United Kingdom Director. John E. Lewis

It's tension and high drama on the ocean waves in this Cadbury's-commissioned propaganda short about the risky but crucial work of protecting the nation's wartime food supplies. A lecture from dad about the need for rationing is aided by some nifty animated statistics about the country's dependence on food imports. Also featured are some fascinating scenes of the unloading of cargo at Britain's ports and docks.

As well as this 19-minute film, which was intended for release to high street cinemas, an edited ten minute version, Food Convoy, was also produced. Focusing primarily on the Merchant Navy's work in protecting convoys, the shorter film was made for screening in more remote locations in venues such as village halls, factory canteens and schools.

Directed by

John E. Lewis

Featuring

Barbara Everest

Percy Marmont

Patrick Curwen

Genres

Documentary

Tags

Military catering Food distribution Rationing Food Royal Navy World War II Evacuation Merchant Navy

Collection

Ration Book Britain

Released

1940

Country

United Kingdom

Language

English

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